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Made with Xara Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire, U.K.
Welcome to this rural village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

JUNE 1917

June   2nd   The   sub-committee   appointed   to   investigate the   farms   and   select   suitable   fields   for   tillage   have   paid Chaddesley   a   visit   during   the   past   week.   Their   decisions have   given   satisfaction   generally   to   the   man   in   the   street, but   have   in   some   quarters   caused   alarm,   consternation, and    even    naughty    words.    The    farmers    generally    are accepting   the   verdict   cheerfully   and   loyally,   and   already the    plough    is    rapidly    exposing    soil    that    has    not    seen daylight   for   many   years.   The   chagrin   of   the   few   has   its advantages in the amusement it has afforded the many. The      Parish      Council      continues      its      crusade      in endeavouring   to   increase   our   food   supply.   The   members have   become   inspectors   of   the   gardens,   so   that   none should    be    neglected.    One    member,    who    appeared    to have    some    inside    knowledge,    hoped    the    inspectors would    note    when    any    undue    proportion    of    garden ground was devoted to flowers instead of food. June   9th    Miss   Meredith ,   who   has   done   such   good   work as   a   voluntary   nurse   at   Hartlebury   Hospital,   has   now   left Chaddesley   to   take   up   nursing   work   entirely.   A   farewell gathering   was   arranged   for   Thursday   last   week,   and,   by the   kind   invitation   of   Edward   Corbett ,   the   soldiers   from the   hospital   were   entertained   at   Pleremore   House.   The guests   from   the   hospital   arrived   by   break   early   in   the afternoon   and   were   soon   enjoying   various   games   on   the lawn. Eggs   for   the   Wounded   -   Miss   Agnes   Meredith    reports the receipt of 588 eggs during May. I    asked    a    soldier    friend    “Don’t    you    long    for    Peace ”? He replied “ I did, that’s why I enlisted .” June   16th    Although   the   spring   was   very   late   ,   weather has   been   so   favourable   during   April   and   May   that   the grass   crops   are   ready   for   cutting   quite   earlier   than   usual. Cutting    has    already    started    and    in    most    cases    good crops   (especially   of   clover)   are   reported.   A   day   of   rain would   be   very   beneficial   to   the   roots,   but   otherwise   we can   only   hope   for   a   continuance   of   the   present   glorious weather for the hay harvest. Several    Chaddesley    natives    witnessed    the    air    raid    in London     on     Wednesday,     and     all     were     among     the fortunate   who   escaped   injury.   One   received   telephone notice   of   the   raid   nearly   half   an   hour   before   it   occurred, but   treated   the   message   as   a   hoax   till   the   bombs   began to    burst    around    her.    Under    such    conditions    it    seems remarkable that no public warning was issued. June   23rd    The   modesty   of   our   soldiers   is   proverbial:   our old    friend    Harry    Wood     has    been    presented     with    the D.C.M    by   the   King,   at   the   rent   investiture   in   Hyde   Park. He   won   the   distinction   by   conspicuous   gallantry   on   the battle   field,   in   France;   yet   up   to   the   present   he   has   not considered   it   necessary   to   let   us   know   anything   about   it. I    notice    a    Worcester    contemporary    claims    him    as    a Worcester    man,    because    he    has    a    sister    living    there. Well,   I   have   an   aunt   in   Chicago;   therefore   I   suppose   I may claim to be a “Yank”. Sunday   evening   a   storm   was   of   such   violence   that   the Vicar   abandoned   any   attempt   at   preaching   a   sermon   to the   few   who   braved   the   elements   to   attend   church.   The flood    waters    did    not    do    so    much    damage    as    in    the previous   storm   but,   unfortunately   the   lightning   played havoc in places. June   30th    On   Monday   morning   Bluntington   was   startled by    a    runaway    horse    attached    to    a    governess    cart. Fortunately   Mr   Haughty   was   in   the   way,   and   pluckily stopped    the    animal.    It    proved    to    be    the    turn-out    of Mr.   J.   P.   Horton ,   of   Tanwood   House,   and   in   the   cart   was their   little   child,   a   timid   little   toddler   of   about   two   years of age who was terribly scared.
© webdesign @ chaddesley corbett
Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

JUNE 1917

June    2nd    The    sub-committee    appointed    to    investigate    the    farms    and select   suitable   fields   for   tillage   have   paid   Chaddesley   a   visit   during   the   past week.   Their   decisions   have   given   satisfaction   generally   to   the   man   in   the street,   but   have   in   some   quarters   caused   alarm,   consternation,   and   even naughty   words.   The   farmers   generally   are   accepting   the   verdict   cheerfully and   loyally,   and   already   the   plough   is   rapidly   exposing   soil   that   has   not seen   daylight   for   many   years.   The   chagrin   of   the   few   has   its   advantages   in the amusement it has afforded the many. The   Parish   Council   continues   its   crusade   in   endeavouring   to   increase   our food   supply.   The   members   have   become   inspectors   of   the   gardens,   so   that none   should   be   neglected.   One   member,   who   appeared   to   have   some inside    knowledge,    hoped    the    inspectors    would    note    when    any    undue proportion of garden ground was devoted to flowers instead of food. June   9th    Miss   Meredith ,   who   has   done   such   good   work   as   a   voluntary nurse   at   Hartlebury   Hospital,   has   now   left   Chaddesley   to   take   up   nursing work   entirely.   A   farewell   gathering   was   arranged   for   Thursday   last   week, and,    by    the    kind    invitation    of    Edward    Corbett ,    the    soldiers    from    the hospital    were    entertained    at    Pleremore    House.    The    guests    from    the hospital   arrived   by   break   early   in   the   afternoon   and   were   soon   enjoying various games on the lawn. Eggs   for   the   Wounded   -   Miss   Agnes   Meredith    reports   the   receipt   of   588 eggs during May. I        asked        a        soldier        friend        “Don’t        you        long        for        Peace ”? He replied “ I did, that’s why I enlisted .” June    16th     Although    the    spring    was    very    late    ,    weather    has    been    so favourable   during   April   and   May   that   the   grass   crops   are   ready   for   cutting quite   earlier   than   usual.   Cutting   has   already   started   and   in   most   cases good   crops   (especially   of   clover)   are   reported.   A   day   of   rain   would   be   very beneficial   to   the   roots,   but   otherwise   we   can   only   hope   for   a   continuance of the present glorious weather for the hay harvest. Several     Chaddesley     natives     witnessed     the     air     raid     in     London     on Wednesday,   and   all   were   among   the   fortunate   who   escaped   injury.   One received    telephone    notice    of    the    raid    nearly    half    an    hour    before    it occurred,   but   treated   the   message   as   a   hoax   till   the   bombs   began   to   burst around   her.   Under   such   conditions   it   seems   remarkable   that   no   public warning was issued. June   23rd    The   modesty   of   our   soldiers   is   proverbial:   our   old   friend   Harry Wood     has    been    presented     with    the    D.C.M     by    the    King,    at    the    rent investiture   in   Hyde   Park.   He   won   the   distinction   by   conspicuous   gallantry on   the   battle   field,   in   France;   yet   up   to   the   present   he   has   not   considered   it necessary    to    let    us    know    anything    about    it.    I    notice    a    Worcester contemporary   claims   him   as   a   Worcester   man,   because   he   has   a   sister living   there.   Well,   I   have   an   aunt   in   Chicago;   therefore   I   suppose   I   may claim to be a “Yank”. Sunday   evening   a   storm   was   of   such   violence   that   the   Vicar   abandoned any   attempt   at   preaching   a   sermon   to   the   few   who   braved   the   elements   to attend   church.   The   flood   waters   did   not   do   so   much   damage   as   in   the previous storm but, unfortunately the lightning played havoc in places. June   30th    On   Monday   morning   Bluntington   was   startled   by   a   runaway horse   attached   to   a   governess   cart.   Fortunately   Mr   Haughty   was   in   the way,    and    pluckily    stopped    the    animal.    It    proved    to    be    the    turn-out    of Mr.   J.   P.   Horton ,   of   Tanwood   House,   and   in   the   cart   was   their   little   child,   a timid little toddler of about two years of age who was terribly scared.
Contemporary History A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.