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Made with Xara Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire, U.K.
Welcome to this rural village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Early Background

The village of Chaddesley Corbett is an ancient settlement with a prehistoric buriel mound and traces of a Roman road. Originally known as Chaddesley the name is thought to mean "Ceadda's clearing in the wood" and is first mentioned in a Saxon Charter of 816 when the land was given to the Bishop of Worcester in return for hospitality to the King of Mercia and his men. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to a Saxon Noblewoman - and had two priests,  several corn mills, a population as large as Kidderminster and two saltpans in Droitwich for it's own use. After the Norman Conquest the Manor of Chaddesley was owned by the Corbett family who added their name to it’s title.  Later, church lands passed to the Earldom of Warwick and, eventually, to the Throckmortons of Coughton Court.

Contemporary History

Chaddesley woods in Chaddesley Corbett became a Nature Reserve in 1973 through the generosity of Mr. John Cadbury. The reserve consists of 53 hectares of native oak woodland and 47 hectares of recent plantations of  young hardwoods and softwoods - which were added to show how wild life conservation can be intergrated with modern commercial management. A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

JULY 1917

July    7th    Mr    and    Mrs    Turner,    of    Harvington ,    have received   news   that   their   son,   Harry ,   previously   reported ‘’missing,’’   is   safe   -   a   prisoner   in   Germany.   He   has   written home,   and   his   parents   are   naturally   much   relieved   to know that he is alive. Cyril   Davis   is   making   good   progress   towards   recovery. He   was   rather   roughly   knocked   about;   wounded   in   arm, elbow and shoulder. We   are   in   the   midst   of   haymaking   season,   and   losing many   an   extra   hour   of   help   because   there   is   no   beer.   A man   who   has   done   his   ordinary   day   at   work   fight’s   shy   in the   evening   of   a   hay   field   with   no   jug   in   it.   Let   those   strict teetotal   principles   try   a   day   of   it   in   a   hot   dry   hay   field. I have and was converted. July   14th   The   past   week   is   locally   known   as   Wake   week. No   attempt   was   made   to   revive   the   wake   proper   this year,    it    is    more    appropriate    for    times    of    peace.    Its religious   significance   was   however   observed   by   a   special dedication   in   the   church,   which   was   attended   by   a   fair number   of   visitors   and   former   Chaddesley   inhabitants, who   continue   the   ancient   custom   to   return   home   for Wake Sunday. July    21st    Rose    day    on    Saturday    was    an    unqualified success.   Profiting   by   the   experience   of   former   years   Mrs Dennis    Fitch    had    made    very    complete    arrangements. She    was    ably    assisted    by    Mrs    Cowper,    Miss    M    Fitch, Misses   Meredith,   Miss   Hill,   Miss   Chambers,   Miss   Good and   Miss   Gwen   Blakeway.   So   energetic   did   they   work that   the   sum   of   £5   -   7s   was   raised.   This   amount   will   be handed over to Kidderminster Infirmary. During   the   month   of   June   Miss   Agnes   Meredith   received 656    eggs,    gifts    for    wounded    soldiers.    Will    those    who cannot    give    eggs    kindly    send    a    donation,    as    Miss Meredith   can   get   the   necessary   supplies.   The   need   for eggs becomes more urgent daily. Mrs   Evans   and   Mrs   Hughes   met   with   a   serious   accident on    Tuesday.    They    were    driving    to    Kidderminster,    and when   near   Heathy   Mill   the   horse   stumbled   and   fell.   The trap    is    rather    a    high    one    and    both    occupants    were pitched   heavily   to   the   ground.   Mrs   Evans   is   now   an   in- patient   at   the   infirmary   with   a   broken   arm   and   other injuries. July    28th    The    many    friends    of    Jim    Wilding     made    at Chaddesley   will   regret   to   hear   that   he   has   been   rather badly   knocked   about   in   France   and   has   been   sent   to hospital   in   the   south   of   England.   He   writes   cheerily   and hopes to pay us a visit when convalescent. After   twenty-seven   weeks   of   anxious   silence   news   has been    received    this    week    from    John    Dickinson .    He    is prisoner    in    Turkey,    but    was    quite    well    at    the    date    of writing   (June   6th)   and   wished   that   he   was   haymaking   at Chaddesley. Well he will find it dry enough here!! Eh? Joe   Dickinson ,   who   emigrated   to   New   Zealand   about four   years   ago,   turned   up   here   unrepentantly   on   Sunday evening.   When   war   broke   out   Joe   joined   the   Anzacs;   and after   seeing   some   fighting   in   Egypt,   was   transferred   to the Western front. He is just enjoying a few days leave. Miss    Florrie    Millward ,    who    for    some    time    has    been working    in    London    for    a    department    of    the    French Government,   has   been   transferred   to   Paris,   where   she   is now   engaged   in   work   connected   with   the   French   War Office.   She   has   had   a   varied   experience   of   the   war.   Spent the   first   few   months   of   the   war   as   a   semi-prisoner   in Germany.   Suffered   the   nerve-rack   of   all   the   London   air raids    and    now    is    experiencing    life    in    “gay    Paris”.    Not much gaiety now I expect.
© webdesign @ chaddesley corbett
Chaddesley Corbett Worcestershire U.K.
Welcome to this historic village set in the beautiful countryside of north Worcestershire

Life in Chaddesley Corbett 100 years ago

JULY 1917

July   7th   Mr   and   Mrs   Turner,   of   Harvington ,   have   received   news   that   their son,   Harry ,   previously   reported   ‘’missing,’’   is   safe   -   a   prisoner   in   Germany. He   has   written   home,   and   his   parents   are   naturally   much   relieved   to   know that he is alive. Cyril    Davis    is    making    good    progress    towards    recovery.    He    was    rather roughly knocked about; wounded in arm, elbow and shoulder. We   are   in   the   midst   of   haymaking   season,   and   losing   many   an   extra   hour of   help   because   there   is   no   beer.   A   man   who   has   done   his   ordinary   day   at work   fight’s   shy   in   the   evening   of   a   hay   field   with   no   jug   in   it.   Let   those strict   teetotal   principles   try   a   day   of   it   in   a   hot   dry   hay   field.      I   have   and was converted. July   14th   The   past   week   is   locally   known   as   Wake   week.   No   attempt   was made   to   revive   the   wake   proper   this   year,   it   is   more   appropriate   for   times of    peace.    Its    religious    significance    was    however    observed    by    a    special dedication   in   the   church,   which   was   attended   by   a   fair   number   of   visitors and   former   Chaddesley   inhabitants,   who   continue   the   ancient   custom   to return home for Wake Sunday. July   21st   Rose   day   on   Saturday   was   an   unqualified   success.   Profiting   by   the experience   of   former   years   Mrs   Dennis   Fitch   had   made   very   complete arrangements.   She   was   ably   assisted   by   Mrs   Cowper,   Miss   M   Fitch,   Misses Meredith,   Miss   Hill,   Miss   Chambers,   Miss   Good   and   Miss   Gwen   Blakeway. So   energetic   did   they   work   that   the   sum   of   £5   -   7s   was   raised.   This   amount will be handed over to Kidderminster Infirmary. During   the   month   of   June   Miss   Agnes   Meredith   received   656   eggs,   gifts   for wounded   soldiers.   Will   those   who   cannot   give   eggs   kindly   send   a   donation, as    Miss    Meredith    can    get    the    necessary    supplies.    The    need    for    eggs becomes more urgent daily. Mrs   Evans   and   Mrs   Hughes   met   with   a   serious   accident   on   Tuesday.   They were    driving    to    Kidderminster,    and    when    near    Heathy    Mill    the    horse stumbled   and   fell.   The   trap   is   rather   a   high   one   and   both   occupants   were pitched    heavily    to    the    ground.    Mrs    Evans    is    now    an    in-patient    at    the infirmary with a broken arm and other injuries. July   28th   The   many   friends   of   Jim   Wilding    made   at   Chaddesley   will   regret to   hear   that   he   has   been   rather   badly   knocked   about   in   France   and   has been   sent   to   hospital   in   the   south   of   England.   He   writes   cheerily   and   hopes to pay us a visit when convalescent. After   twenty-seven   weeks   of   anxious   silence   news   has   been   received   this week   from   John   Dickinson .   He   is   prisoner   in   Turkey,   but   was   quite   well   at the    date    of    writing    (June    6th)    and    wished    that    he    was    haymaking    at Chaddesley. Well he will find it dry enough here!! Eh? Joe    Dickinson ,    who    emigrated    to    New    Zealand    about    four    years    ago, turned   up   here   unrepentantly   on   Sunday   evening.   When   war   broke   out   Joe joined   the   Anzacs;   and   after   seeing   some   fighting   in   Egypt,   was   transferred to the Western front. He is just enjoying a few days leave. Miss   Florrie   Millward ,   who   for   some   time   has   been   working   in   London   for a   department   of   the   French   Government,   has   been   transferred   to   Paris, where   she   is   now   engaged   in   work   connected   with   the   French   War   Office. She   has   had   a   varied   experience   of   the   war.   Spent   the   first   few   months   of the   war   as   a   semi-prisoner   in   Germany.   Suffered   the   nerve-rack   of   all   the London   air   raids   and   now   is   experiencing   life   in   “gay   Paris”.   Not   much gaiety now I expect.
Contemporary History A "Jubilee Walk" was introduced in 1977 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Queen's accession to the throne.  The walk is marked by yellow arrows - which indicate public rights of way - and by white arrows which indicate courtesy paths.   There are Voluntary Wardens for the woods and the area is managed by the Nature Conservancy Council. The Woods are a special feature of the area and attract many visitors all through the year. Car parking only by the roadside. Guard against thefts.